senior cat adoption

Senior Cat Adoption

Adopting a senior cat can be one of the best decisions youmake. When you welcome your new adopted pet into your home, try these tips tomake your pet’s transition as the newest member of your family go smoothly for both of you.

Toilet Training

Your senior cat is probably used to the litter box location in their old foster home (or shelter). They might have a few accidents while they figure out the new litterbox situation. Older cats are creatures of habit, so don’t be too alarmed if your cat takes some time to figure out where their new litter box is and commits to a new routine. Make sure you keep the litter box clean (we recommend scooping daily) to prevent further incidents. This is also good hygiene!

Behavior

Older cats adjust to new surroundings more slowly than kittens or adolescents. Your new furry friend might hide under furniture or be more skittish than they were when you first met them at the shelter ortheir foster home. That’s normal! Give them time to get used to their new family (you) and their new home. Don’t be too aggressive in approaching them—this could scare them off even more and make developing your relationship more difficult. Learn that you must gain their trust over the long term and be patient with them as they adapt to their new environment.

Shedding

Your new pet might be shedding more than youexpected. This, too, is normal. Older catstend to shed more than younger ones. Catsalso shed more when they are in stressful situations, and your cat might be stressed out by their new home. All pets shed, so while your cat might not shed this much all the time, be prepared for some fur to fly. Invest in a pet hair sticky roller and/or a good pet hair vacuum. These will help you keep the stray hair at bay and your home clean.

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